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Dr. Gretchen Neigh: Creative and Novel Ideas in HIV Research (CNIHR) Programme Award Winner

Posted 21 juillet 2014, 11:13 , by Guest

By Dr Gretchen Neigh, Assistant Professor, Emory University

The Creative and Novel Ideas in HIV Research (CNIHR) Programme is presented by the International AIDS Society (IAS) in collaboration with the Centers for AIDS Research Program (CFAR) and the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). The programme aims to encourage innovation in the field of HIV research by providing one to two years of funding to early-stage scientists who do not have prior work experience with HIV. The CNIHR Programme allows the grantees the opportunity to conduct cutting-edge research on HIV and AIDS. More...

Nitasha Kumar - AIDS 2012 IAS/ANRS Young Investigator Awardee - two years on!

Posted 08 juillet 2014, 11:14 , by Guest

By Emily Shaw, Research Promotion Intern, International AIDS Society

At the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012), the IAS/ANRS Young Investigator Award – Special HIV Cure Prize was awarded to Nitasha Kumar for the abstract entitled, “Myeloid dendritic cells and HIV latency in resting T cells.” This project investigated the interactions between dendritic cells and resting CD4+ T-cells as they relate to the establishment and maintenance of HIV latency, and the results have implicated that myeloid dendritic cells play a key role in HIV latency in resting memory CD4+ T-cells. The US$2,000 prize is jointly funded by the IAS and the French National Agency for Research on AIDS and Viral Hepatitis (ANRS) to support young researchers who demonstrate innovation, originality, rationale and quality in the field of cure-related HIV research.

In preparation for the upcoming AIDS 2014 conference this summer in Melbourne, Australia, the IAS has gotten back in touch with Ms. Kumar to hear her thoughts on the impact the prize has had on her life and work over the past two years. More...

Dr. Shomyseh Sanjabi: Creative and Novel Ideas in HIV Research (CNIHR) Programme Awards

Posted 25 juin 2014, 10:29 , by Guest

By Emily Shaw, Research Promotion Intern, International AIDS Society

The Creative and Novel Ideas in HIV Research (CNIHR) programme awards up to US$150,000 funding (direct costs) per year for one to two years to promising, early-stage scientists who have not previously worked in the area of HIV research. Presented by the International AIDS Society (IAS) in collaboration with the Centers for AIDS Research Program (CFAR) and the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), the programme aims to encourage innovation in this field. The grants are awarded at the International AIDS Conferences as well as the IAS Conferences on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention. Grantees are given the opportunity to attend these conferences in the year they are awarded and in subsequent years in order to present their progress.

At the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012), twelve outstanding early-stage researchers from a range of scientific disciplines and locations, including Argentina, India, and the United States, were awarded as recipients of the CNIHR grant programme. More...

Stronger Together

Posted 13 juin 2014, 10:35 , by Conference Secretariat

By Sébastien Morin, IAS-ILF Research Officer

The International AIDS Society (IAS) recognizes the crucial role that a diversity of stakeholders, including industry, plays in the response to the HIV epidemic and also values the involvement of and dialogue with many key stakeholders. Only through a fully multi‑stakeholder approach can critical gaps in HIV research and implementation strategies be identified and effective solutions developed for addressing them.

At AIDS 2014, the IAS will convene a large group of diverse industry stakeholders for a bi-directional consultation. This closed meeting will be an occasion for the IAS to present its strategic programmes and priorities (e.g., Key Affected Populations, Paediatrics/CIPHER, Towards an HIV Cure, Journal of the International AIDS Society, Prizes and Awards/Grants and Fellowships) while getting insights from industry partners regarding their interests in order to foster further collaboration. Following short presentations by IAS Governing Council More...

On the Road with HIV Cure Research Part One: Denver Via Stockholm

Posted 19 septembre 2013, 11:02 , by Sharon Lewin, AIDS 2014 Local Co-Chair

First published on www.huffingtonpost.co.uk on 16 September 2013

Sharon LewinAs I flew out from Stockholm to Denver last Wednesday it occurred to me how far we had come in HIV Cure research since the International AIDS Society held the first HIV Cure workshop at the AIDS 2010 conference in Vienna.

I've been in Stockholm this week speaking on how a group of cancer drugs called HDAC inhibitors can activate latent HIV at an HIV Cure conference organised by the Karolinska Institutet and all of us who attended have come away feeling energised and encouraged. More...

HIV/AIDS: The Australian Response

Posted 15 septembre 2013, 10:13 , by Sharon Lewin, AIDS 2014 Local Co-Chair

First published on www.huffingtonpost.co.uk on 2 May 2013

Sharon LewinThe recent global news story that a newborn child in the US had been "functionally" cured of HIV was a powerful reminder of just how far we have come in the past three decades. The "Mississippi Baby" encapsulates the hope that many of us now share - to one day finding a cure for HIV. It also reminds us of the great contribution that Science has made in transforming what was once a death sentence into a chronic manageable disease.

HIV treatments can now transform lives; antiretrovirals are highly effective, and if started at the right time, the life expectancy of someone living with HIV is the same as an uninfected person. Treatment also dramatically reduces HIV transmission. These striking scientific advances have led many to believe that seeing an end to AIDS is no longer a dream - but within our reach now. The challenge now is marshalling the required forces -- scientific, clinical, political and funding - to do what we know works. More...